Le Contesse vineyards are located in the heart of Conegliano Valdobbiadene, magnificent hills which are being kissed by the sun and developed out of centuries of wine culture. They are unique and awarded for the quality of their vines. For which they have been nominated by Unesco as a world heritage.

The whole growing and production process is done biologically to respect the landscape and the people who live there and in order to maintain the harmony with the nature. The vineyards are on the sunny side of the mountain and at a height of between 50 and 200 meters above the sea level. The ground is mainly clay soil, a bit sandy and contains some lime soils.

Le Contesse made itself a name in the world of production sparkling wines, because their value is to have a perfect production with natural fizz.

The process of creating this wine is a secret of the winery; the majority of the must is stocked at low temperatures so that it can be used immediately. That is what makes the difference; this ensures that the aromas and the bouquet are present in taste and is a reminder of the area where it comes from.

Winery Profile:

Owner
Loris Bonotto & Luigina Peterle
Founded
1976.
Winemaker
Loris Bonotto & Enrico Buffoni
Annual production
4.000.000 bottles
Vineyards
200 ha
Web site
www.lecontesse.it

Owner
Loris Bonotto & Luigina Peterle
Founded
1976.
Winemaker
Loris Bonotto & Enrico Buffoni
Annual production
4.000.000 bottles
Vineyards
200 ha
Web site
www.lecontesse.it

Gallery:

Prosecco, Veneto

The Prosecco region is a part of the Veneto region in Northeast Italy, named by a small village near Trieste.

The best areas for growing the grapes for Prosecco are the hills of Asolo (and Montello), Valdobbiadene and Conegliano, and, at the top of the quality pyramid, the slopes of Cartizze.

In the past, the grape used to make Prosecco was called both Prosecco and Glera. The thin-skinned green grape has been grown in the Veneto and Friuli regions of northern Italy for hundreds of years.

But in 2009, an increased number of New World plantings led Italian authorities to seek legal protection for the name “Prosecco” by rechristening the variety as “Glera.” It was a move akin to how the French protect the name Champagne as a place of origin.

It dates back to the year 1895 in which Federico Martinotti invented the secondary fermentation in big barrels. This was refined in the year 1910 by the Frenchman Eugene Charmat.

This method is still used to make Prosecco and bares its name by inventors – Martinotti/Charmat. The base wine is added to a pressure tank, then a second fermentation is triggered by adding yeast and sugar. Cooling the wine when the desired atmospheres of pressure has been reached stops the rapid fermentation. This method retains Glera’s aromas and freshness.

There are 3 types of Prosecco:

  1. Still/Fermo (minimum alcohol strength of 10,5% and the CO2 overpressure under 1 Bar)
  2. Semi-sparkling/Frizzante (minimum alcohol strength of 10,5% and the CO2 overpressure between 1 and 2,5 Bar)
  3. Sparkling/Spumante (minimum alcohol strength of 11% and the CO2 overpressure more than 3 Bar)

The most common type is Sparkling wine or Spumante, and the least common is Still wine or Fermo.

There are 4 styles of sparkling Prosecco:

  1. Brut (residual sugar under 12g/liter)
  2. Extra Dry (residual sugar between 12 and 17g/liter)
  3. Dry (residual sugar between 17 and 32g/liter)
  4. Demi-Sec (residual sugar between 32 and 50g/liter)

Le Contesse Wines

  • Le Contesse Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Brut

    Le Contesse Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Brut

    1.450 rsd
  • Le Contesse Prosecco Rose Brut

    1.110 rsd
  • Le Contesse Prosecco Extra Dry

    Le Contesse Prosecco Extra Dry

    980 rsd
  • Le Contesse Prosecco Extra Dry piccolo

    350 rsd